How Millennials are Impacting the Housing Market & its Future.

How Millennials are Impacting the Housing Market & its Future.

It’s common today to hear social observers discuss how the priorities of Millennials have shifted away from their elders, the Baby Boomer, and Gen X.

They say that most Millennials are not interested in buying homes and being saddled with a mortgage for 15 to 30 years. Rather, they are opting for a “lighter” lifestyle that allows them to be fluid, travel, and not be pinned down to the kinds of 9-to-5 jobs conducive to buying homes.

Well, take all those assumptions and toss them on the scrap heap of misguided punditry.

Statistics clearly show that Millennials are driving a surge in home buying. Amazingly, it’s those in their late 20s and 30s leading the way. While “experts” have given us the impression that Millennials have adopted a “gig economy” lifestyle that’s highly mobile, it seems more of them are opting to put down roots.

Stuart Eisenberg is the national director for construction and real estate BDO USA, a prominent accounting firm. He said Millennials have had some time now to pay off student loan debt and to get settled in their careers. He expects this youthful demographic to play “the disruptor role” in the real estate sector with an accelerated home-buying pace in the coming years.

Millennials are also shifting the way house buyers traditionally seek a permanent place to call home. They are far more likely to use mobile tech devices in their search for properties. This, in turn, will cause an adjustment in the way real estate agents choose to develop marketing strategies. The National Realtors Association reports that 99% of Millennials employ online searches for general information about the housing market. They also prefer text messaging as their preferred way to interact with real estate agents. Baby Boomers still prefer live phone conversations or face-to-face meetings.

Furthermore, Millennials are blowing right past smaller starter homes and opting for upscale models in suburbs and the rural edges of larger cities. The trend is to avoid costly inner-city properties. The COVID-19 factor is partly driving the latter phenomenon.

Ten years ago, few would have predicted the Millennials would be driving a trend toward increased demand for more expensive homes located in suburbs and rural areas.

 

How are Millennials Impacting the Housing Market?

How are Millennials Impacting the Housing Market?

The impactful strides towards economic recovery have resulted in an influx of millennial homebuyers. The ability to pay their debts and advancements on time through their careers has accelerated confidence in owning homes. In fact, the homeownership rate is four times higher than any other age group, making this a heated topic of discussion. According to projections soon, the smaller cities will run out of space, owing to the housing boom powered by this generation. However, millennials do not view homeownership as permanent as they change houses from now and then. Let’s review the expected millennials’ impact in the housing market:

Technology-Driven

No life of a millennial is complete without technology. It is not a surprise; most of them deploy technology in the process of buying homes. This has fundamentally changed the duties of real estate agents and brokers. As a result, the housing market has adapted to new marketing strategies and methods.

Suburban Appreciation

The standards of living in urban centers have soared, as the majority of the millennials nowadays are opting for suburban homes. Mostly rental market is the contributing factor to urban life audacities. Due to the many cost-conscious millennials, the housing market will have to shift for cheaper suburban homes.

Increased Competition

As the economy continues to strengthen, the majority of the millennials will actively participate in the housing market. This will contribute to higher levels of competition in the housing market as investors strive for perfection to satisfy their customers. This means the commercial real estate investors will have to focus on new constructions rather than the “fixer-uppers.”

Transparent Information and Communication

Due to the housing crisis and frustrations, many millennials value having access to trustworthy information. Thus, the housing market will have to adjust to an airtight system of keeping the customers happy and mitigate the risks. This is only achievable through authentic communication mechanisms.

Millennials will continue to shape up the housing market according to housing dynamics. Their preferences will be significantly crucial to favorable housing market evolutions.

The Most Common Myths of Real Estate Investing

The Most Common Myths of Real Estate Investing

If you’re looking to turn some extra cash into profit, you have a multitude of options. Real estate investment is only one of them, and many people enjoy it. While it is a solid business, you might find yourself encountering these common myths when researching this subject.

It Takes a Lot of Money

You don’t have to be a millionaire to become a real estate investor, and you don’t need to be free of debt. Many entrepreneurs make money by finding opportunities and presenting them to buyers who have existing capital. Even if you have only $5,000, you can enter a real estate investment trust and split profits down the line.

You Have to be Rich to be Successful

Thankfully, your level of success doesn’t depend on your existing bank balance. You can choose from three different types of real estate investing: residential, commercial and land. These come in assorted sizes, shapes and price points. Mostly, your skills and knowledge determine the level of success.

You Need Special Certifications

Real estate professionals often function as investors, but it’s because they know the market and deal with properties daily. Their success does not rely on a real estate license. Since any adult can legally buy property, you can purchase real estate that’s in any type of condition for investment purposes.

Real Estate Investing is Time Consuming

People see frantic professionals darting from place to place with a phone pressed to their ear. This makes them think that investing in real estate takes a lot of time. While it is true that engaging in pursuits that lead to profit takes time, it won’t eat up your day.

Consider that many people spend at least three hours per day watching television. What if you used some of that time to research sound investments? Additionally, when you go house hunting, you can involve the whole family and have some fun too.

You Need Experience

Chances are, some people might try to talk you out of real estate investing because you lack experience. However, don’t let irrational fear stop you. While experience improves chances of success, it’s neither necessary nor does it guarantee anything. At one time, everyone is a beginner and will gain experience by practicing.

While there are plenty of myths out there about real estate investing, do not believe them before you conduct some research first. With the right information, you will be ready to take on the world of real estate investing in no time.

How to Stage Your Home for Millennial Homebuyers

Once upon a time, showing your house off to buyers just meant cleaning it. But now, “staging” has become a part of the sales process. Staging means decorating your home to appeal to potential homebuyers—a process that can mean anything from repainting the walls, to buying new furniture or updating old appliances.

        Staging is about more than making your home look good—it has to look like what potential homebuyers are interested in. And today, more than 30% of those homebuyers are millennials—people born between 1980 and 2000. So how do home sellers appeal to this new generation? Here are some ideas:

Make it Photogenic

        If you want to appeal to millennials, make sure your home has a good online presence. Take clear, attractive photos and make sure all the details about your home are posted on the web. What they find online may very well determine whether millennial homebuyers even want to visit.

Keep it Clean and Simple

        Obviously your home should not be dirty when you show it off. But more than that, eliminate clutter. Millennials like homes to look spare and simple, with lots of space for entertaining. Many millennials—and certainly those looking into buying a home—have full-time jobs coupled with busy social lives, so they will want a place that looks easy to maintain and keep clean. Hide knick-knacks, and anything that might make your house look dated: doilies, quilts, lots of fancy china, or heavy or frilly curtains.

Think Green

        Millennials are concerned about the environment; so don’t be surprised if you are asked about your home’s sustainability. Projects such as insulating your home or installing more efficient appliances can help draw in young homebuyers worried about their footprints.

Fashion a Home Office

        Creating a home office doesn’t have to be a major project. If you have a guest room or catch-all space in your house, clean it out and stick a desk and chair inside. Many millennials work from home, at least part-time, and want a designated space to work from.

Paint

Even if you don’t have the budget to make major renovations, just painting walls can make a huge impact. Wallpaper, especially patterned wallpaper, can make a home seem old-fashioned and cramped. Full-wall mirrors from the 80s are arguably worse. Painting your walls is a good way to modernize. Use light, muted colors to make everything seem modern, spacious, and well-lit.

Think About Location

        Are you in walkable distance from a grocery store, coffee shop, or library? If you answered yes, or if you can think of any other choice destinations in reasonable walking distance, make sure to advertise it! You can’t change your location, but it would be a mistake not to promote it.

What’s Wrong With Being a Fixer-Upper?

        If your house is a fixer-upper, and fixing it yourself is out of your budget, be honest about it! Many millennials are looking for a move-in ready house, but others would be happy to get a deal and a challenge.

 

 

How to Get Mortgage if You Are a Self-Employed Millennial

As housing prices continue to rise, the millennial generation is having a difficult time trying to find a property that they can afford. Those that consider themselves self employed must work even harder when applying for a mortgage.

Regardless of your profession, if you enjoy working for yourself and want to achieve the American dream of homeownership, use the following tips to when applying for a mortgage:Clean up your Finances

Banks that offer mortgages to self employed consumers will highly scrutinize business financials. This means that your personal and business accounts must be separate and that you’ll need to minimize the amount of deductions you take over the course of 12 months prior to your application.

Make sure you’ve kept good financial records that are ready to be presented to the mortgage broker.

Apply for an Alternative Loan

Standard mortgages are often hard to come by for the self employed millennial, which is why some banks are offering alternative financing.

Similar to the “no doc” loans of a decade ago, alternative loans use different income verification methods for the self employed. This process involves examining 12 months worth of bank statements against the profit and loss statements for the same time period. A cash flow analysis is created to determine suitability for obtaining a mortgage.

The Basics that You’ll Need

Like any other buyer, self employed individuals will need to provide specific requirements to the bank during the mortgage approval process. Those can include:

  • Bank statements - Both personal and business, bank statements will show that you have the necessary funds to pay the down payment and initial monthly payment.
  • Profit and Loss statement - A profit and loss statement is essential to creating an analysis for mortgage approval.
  • Proof of business formation - If your business is formed as an LLC or corporation, you’ll need to provide proof as well.
  • Solid credit history - In most cases, self employed consumers will need a credit score of at least 680 to qualify for a mortgage.
  • Sizable down payment - Banks often consider self employed people more of a risk for mortgage lending and they’ll require a down payment of around 20 percent.

While obtaining a mortgage as a self employed millennial is difficult, it isn’t impossible. The right amount of research combined with careful planning and record keeping will help make the process much easier.