How to Break Down the 70% Rule in Home Flipping

How to Break Down the 70% Rule in Home Flipping

How do you know if a house is a smart investment or a good property to flip? You may be looking to acquire properties for your portfolio. The problem is it can be a struggle to identify good deals quickly. Read on to learn how the 70% rule will help you.

The 70% Rule is a Simple Rule of Thumb.

Investors and flippers should use the 70% rule to determine whether to buy a property. The rule states that you should only pay 70% of the after repair value of a home.

An example would be a $175,000 home that needs $10,000 in repairs. After repair, it would be worth roughly $200,000. A flipper or investor should only pay 70% of that. The total they should pay is $140,000 for the home.

This protects them from overestimating the value of the home. It also protects against downturns in the market.

Speculating that a property will increase in value can be very dangerous. Seasoned investors prefer to make money when they buy to minimize their risks. This also protects them in case they missed something.

Other Factors To Consider For the 70% Rule.

You should also consider a few other factors. Settlement costs, financing costs, and carrying costs take a large chunk out of the deal too.

Closing costs on a $200,000 property could easily be 2 to 5% of the property. This means it would be up to $10,000. Financing costs would likely be around $5,000.

You should subtract $15,000 from your offer price to account for these factors. Some sellers may not discount the whole amount. It is better to get some of these off the cost to protect your margins.

Exceptions to the 70% Rule

The 70% Rule is a simple rule of thumb for finding rentals and flips. It is only a starting point. There are other circumstances where you might want to ignore it.

One of these cases will be if you’re holding the property long-term. Then, you would not spend as much on renovations.

You would be more concerned about the cash flow. Getting a good deal would still be necessary. A better price will still allow you to get lower monthly payments. Lower payments will help you with cash flow.

Next Steps:

Take the time to determine your situation and goals. Are you looking to get quick cash? Other times you’ll be looking for steady returns over the long-term.

The 70% rule is a good rule of thumb. You should always be cautious with your repair and closing costs. It is a good starting place to protect your profits.            

 

How to Determine if a Home is Worth Flipping

How to Determine if a Home is Worth Flipping

An essential skill in making a house flipping profit in the real estate business is knowing how to value a house properly. For individuals who are in the industry to make profits from low purchases. Here are ways to determine worthy homes to flip.

Average Value Determination: The house post-rehab value is determined by considering the cost of the houses in the general vicinity and the price of recently sold homes similar to the post-rehab vision. The final worth after repairs is the value you use for determining the worth of the house.

Standard cosmetic rehab: A general rule to estimate repair costs is $20 for every square foot. Based on this assumption, adjustments can be made upwards or downwards depending on the individual house’s specifications. This value will help determine whether to select the house for flipping.

Transactional expenses: Purchase closing costs are usually paid by the seller and account for 0.5 percent of the purchase price. The selling closing costs range between 1-6 percent, with an additional 1 percent as attorney fees. Holding costs such as property taxes, insurance, utilities, and maintenance costs should also be considered.

Offer price-setting- There are formulas to determine what offer price will be stated. One way is to get 70 percent of the average repair value deducting the repair costs. Another way is to subtract the repair costs, closing and holding expenses, and desired profit from the ARV to get the right offer price.

Geographical setting: Proximity to facilities such as shopping malls, transportation services, and school increases the property’s value while highways and airports decrease it. Different locales may have various school taxes, municipal and private trash collection companies with different days.

Physical attributes: As much as the seller wants the house to stand out, it shouldn’t be so significantly marked up in features that it overshadows the neighboring houses. It will only lead to a scenario where it will be too costly for that neighborhood. The most successful house flips are those that have the most work. However, if structural issues are suspected, it would be wiser to buy a house in better condition.

Lenders- Rehab lenders give between 65-70 percent of the ARV. This factor is because an investment is made with the anticipation of making money in the end. If the lender advises otherwise, then there will not be enough equity for the investing party to make money in the end.

Renovations to Consider for an Investment Property

Renovations to Consider for an Investment Property

As a real estate investor, making your property appealing to potential buyers or renters is a step in the right direction towards getting a return on your investment. While you might want to stray away from full “fixer-uppers” (at least until you gain enough experience), there are some renovations you might want to consider to add value to your investment property. 

Flooring 

The floor throughout your property plays an important role in the renovation process. Is there carpet throughout? Or, can you find the hidden gem of original hard-wood? Figure out what interior look you’re going for, or look into current trends. If you want to keep the originality of the flooring, you can have them sanded and refinished for a fresh new look. 

Updated Kitchens and Bathrooms 

As we’ve mentioned, a full flip is a significant challenge unless you have the experience and resources. But, rest assured, there are a few great ways to update a kitchen without completely breaking the bank. Kitchen cabinets are often a focal point of what potential tenants or buyers are looking for. Cabinets are great to work with; if they have a good base and minimal damage, a quick sanding and fresh stain or a new coat of paint can go a long way. Finish them off with new hardware to complete the updated look. For countertops, you may want to consider replacing them if the current ones are dated.

Paint, Paint, Paint

A fresh coat of paint in each room goes a long way in “sprucing” things up a bit. Choose popular colors that are surrounding what’s currently trending. This is where you can have a little fun and figure out what potential renters or buyers are looking for. 

Curb Appeal 

Your focus shouldn’t just be directed toward the interior of your property; exterior matters just as much. Make sure your investment property is appealing to anyone that might be interested. Keep the grounds maintained well and consider a few different landscaping or garden options. The property being well kept on the outside is a great first impression. 

 

How to Calculate the ROI on a Rental Property

How to Calculate the ROI on a Rental Property

Rental properties can be a great asset to investment portfolios, particularly if they are successfully managed. There are many different types of real properties that can be converted into rentals. Commercial properties, when fully occupied, generally pay higher dividends for investors. Residential rental properties are said to be an addictive habit because investors purchase additional rentals consistently over time. Whether an investor chooses to select commercial, residential, or other property as a rental, there are some considerations that should be carefully weighed.

The return on investment (ROI) will be greatly impacted based on a number of different factors. Investors cannot simply calculate the purchase price of the real property and the average monthly lease income for the property. Many other conditions exist and must be factored into an accurate ROI on rental property.

Taxes and Insurance

The overall ROI depends in part on the geographical location of a particular property. There are various local and state ordinances that require lot rent, property tax, school tax, and other fees to be paid by the land or property owner. These may seem minute, but they will impact the overall return on investment. This calculation can be simplified by the net income gain of the property divided by the cost of the property. Net income gain is basically the income generated minus the cost of the property. These calculations can be based on monthly or annual figures and the end result will be the same.

Maintenance and Utilities

One major area that many landowners and property managers fail to consider when calculating rental income are the essential costs associated with the building or property. Commercial properties of course entail much higher overhead costs than residential properties, but these elemental items should be considered for all types of real property. Second to required insurance, routine maintenance and repairs are among the highest expenses that property owners incur.

Maintenance and repairs on a commercial building may require certified repairs that are filed with a city or county records office. Monthly utilities such as gas, electric, water, sewer, and trash pick up are generally required whether the property is currently being rented or not. Unless these are passed along to tenants, the property owner must deduct these monthly expenses from their net return on investment.

Affordable Housing and Real Estate Investment

Affordable Housing and Real Estate Investment

Recently, the problem of housing has come to dominate the conversation in many countries around the world. The UK, with its tradition of council housing, has faced shocks to its system. Housing is more and more out of the reach of many working people there. The US is facing a housing crisis, too. Migration of millennials to cities has created increased demand for housing there. This has driven rents up and out of the reach of working-class people. It almost seems that no matter where you are, rents are soaring up and reasonably priced homes are far and few between.

A companion problem is that working-class wages have stagnated since the Great Recession. Working-class people often lack cars and can’t find a workable way to make a move to the suburbs. All of this has created a seemingly intractable housing crisis in cities like New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles. All of this has been immensely frustrating, both for the people who live in these cities and for politicians. However, there’s also a great opportunity in this crisis, if only people will take the time to think it through.

Currently, four out of ten low income people are either homeless or spending over 50% of their income on rent, which is unsustainable in the long-term. The US is short by at least several million low income housing units. This is a tremendous opportunity for investors, if they are able to play it right. Social housing in the United States often gets a bad name. However, there are real advantages to landlords when it comes to dealing with social housing programs.

For example, section 8 arrives on time every month. Renting to lower income tenants can mean missed, partial or late payments. Dealing with government agencies means much more reliable cash flow, even if there can be a lag initially. Social impact investment firms have also made affordable housing one of their pet causes. Groups like Turner Impact Capital and Building Opportunity have made it a point to focus on affordable housing. This investment takes many forms, from crowdsourcing online to REITs.

Avalon Communities, a company known for providing corporate apartments, has also shifted their focus to renovating older buildings for more middle-income and lower-income clientele. As these big investments by big players demonstrate, there’s a very healthy future in providing low income housing.