The Most Common Myths of Real Estate Investing

The Most Common Myths of Real Estate Investing

If you’re looking to turn some extra cash into profit, you have a multitude of options. Real estate investment is only one of them, and many people enjoy it. While it is a solid business, you might find yourself encountering these common myths when researching this subject.

It Takes a Lot of Money

You don’t have to be a millionaire to become a real estate investor, and you don’t need to be free of debt. Many entrepreneurs make money by finding opportunities and presenting them to buyers who have existing capital. Even if you have only $5,000, you can enter a real estate investment trust and split profits down the line.

You Have to be Rich to be Successful

Thankfully, your level of success doesn’t depend on your existing bank balance. You can choose from three different types of real estate investing: residential, commercial and land. These come in assorted sizes, shapes and price points. Mostly, your skills and knowledge determine the level of success.

You Need Special Certifications

Real estate professionals often function as investors, but it’s because they know the market and deal with properties daily. Their success does not rely on a real estate license. Since any adult can legally buy property, you can purchase real estate that’s in any type of condition for investment purposes.

Real Estate Investing is Time Consuming

People see frantic professionals darting from place to place with a phone pressed to their ear. This makes them think that investing in real estate takes a lot of time. While it is true that engaging in pursuits that lead to profit takes time, it won’t eat up your day.

Consider that many people spend at least three hours per day watching television. What if you used some of that time to research sound investments? Additionally, when you go house hunting, you can involve the whole family and have some fun too.

You Need Experience

Chances are, some people might try to talk you out of real estate investing because you lack experience. However, don’t let irrational fear stop you. While experience improves chances of success, it’s neither necessary nor does it guarantee anything. At one time, everyone is a beginner and will gain experience by practicing.

While there are plenty of myths out there about real estate investing, do not believe them before you conduct some research first. With the right information, you will be ready to take on the world of real estate investing in no time.
Reasons Why An Objective Risk Model Pays Off In Real Estate Investing

Reasons Why An Objective Risk Model Pays Off In Real Estate Investing

Winner’s curse is one of the most critical aspects of real estate investing. It is a situation where the winner of a bid pays more than the worth of the property. It is an unfortunate occurrence since no one wants their efforts to go into waste. Performing objective due diligence is the best way to dodge the curse or any other unforeseen circumstances. Additionally, it helps to overcome bias in decision making.
Although the winner’s curse is unfortunate to an investor, it is a benefit to real estate fund managers. This is because they can differentiate early enough whether a valuation is optimistic or conservative. The curse has also caught experienced investors. They tend to overlook certain property fundamentals or rely on unviable strategies.
Atlantic Richfield engineers noticed that sometimes aggressive bids might prove to be too optimistic. They discovered that in the oil and gas auctions, essential information might be hidden beneath the surface.
Although valuations may vary in different industries, in real estate, prices might not reflect the underlying value. This is maybe due to the risk in investment property of setting the wrong prices, false assumptions or business plans that are not feasible. Furthermore, in private equity real estate, there is the rush to close the deal instead of waiting for the right opportunity or time.
For most investors, sticking to conservative strategies seems the most rational thing to do. However, behavioral economics indicate that markets are not always rational. In most cases, sellers hold unrealistic prices while buyers concentrate on factors that do not add intrinsic value.
There are limitless deals in the real estate industry. However, it is advisable to carefully check the inefficiencies that prevent investment opportunities to achieve the expected value. In fact, nowadays there is growing data science that can help to evaluate properties before committing an investment.
Due diligence is the best way to control the risks involved in real estate investment. However, it may not provide the nature of the risks. There are two major lessons when investing in real estate. First, joint ventures do not always guarantee favorable returns. Although getting into partnerships might reduce structural risks, they also limit control of investment and ultimately lessen the proceeds. Second, making off-market deals does not always guarantee a better return on investment. Therefore as an investor, find a suitable data-driven procedure that will help evade the winner’s curse.
4 Ways Landlords Can Improve Their Relationships With Their Tenants

4 Ways Landlords Can Improve Their Relationships With Their Tenants

4 Ways Landlords Can Improve Their Relationships With Their Tenants

Investing in a rental property can offer many benefits. Not only can it help provide a steady monthly income, but it can help build your net worth. However, by investing your time with rental properties, as a landlord, you will have to maintain it, and make it attractive for tenants, and find renters who can be trusted.

Often the relationship between landlord and tenant is poor and strained. Talk to any landlord and they are bound to share a tenant horror story or two about an unruly renter. By establishing a more professional and positive relationship with your tenant, you’ll find that you will have less tenant horror stories to share. The following are four ways that landlords can improve their relationships with their tenants.

Be Approachable

Often, tenants are afraid to contact their landlord about issues they are experiencing. Sometimes tenants don’t tell their landlords about repairs until the problem worsens or is out of control. Tenants are afraid of asking for help because they don’t want to bother the landlord or are afraid. Landlords should be both supportive and approachable to ensure that their tenants feel comfortable calling in their time of need.

Be An Effective Communicator

A good line of communication is essential to solving many rental problems. Tenants should have an understanding of why something is happening and be given proper notice for anything that may be disruptive. By landlords providing the most up-to-date information, the tenant will be more willing to work with the landlord rather than against.

Be Hands On

When you lease your property, you must be hands on. Often landlords will want to have rent out their property but make little repairs to the home. You should help your tenant feel important by going out of the way to make improvements. Not only will this make your tenants happy, but it will keep your resale value high.

Be Considerate

One of the most important things that any landlord can remember is that tenants are people too. Sometimes it can be easy to forget that your tenants are people with feelings and not just a monthly profit. As a landlord, you have a direct impact on the social and emotional environment for other people. That being said, treat your tenants with the same support and respect that you would want.

Understanding the Value of Multifamily Real Estate

Understanding the Value of Multifamily Real Estate

Riding the heels of an especially strong housing market, investors are turning more and more toward real estate as a viable and profitable business venture. One of the hottest segments of the real estate market is the multifamily housing sector. Despite being a longer process when it comes to generating income and profit than its single-family property investment counterparts, the multifamily market can be extremely profitable when executed properly.

 

Although it seems counter-intuitive, securing financing for a multifamily property can often be easier than getting the money for a single-family property. The reason for this is because there is a much smaller risk of not generating enough cash flow when there are multiple properties involved. What can often be confusing is calculating the value of a multifamily property because of the myriad of complexities involved. In order to calculate an accurate value, the following considerations must all be examined:

 

OPERATING EXPENSES: This list of expenses can be varied and long. Examples include snow removal, landscaping, pool maintenance, and pest control.

 

CAPITAL EXPENDITURES: Also known as CapEx, these funds are used by the property management or investor to acquire new assets or upgrade existing facilities with the intention of improving or increasing the breadth of the operation. Examples of capital expenditures in multifamily properties include new air conditioning units, roofing replacements, playground additions, water heaters, and more. Property managers will want to set aside larger amounts for annual capital expenditures if the property is older since repairs and upgrades will be more likely. Newer properties will not require as much capital expenditure investment, which will make these more attractive to investors.

 

NET OPERATING INCOME: This definition is self-explanatory. Net operating income is simply the total income generated from the multifamily property after the total operating expenses have been subtracted.

 

CAP RATE: This calculation is a little more specific. It refers to the exact rate of return from the property after income is considered. These rates are distinct to a certain market and drawn by the kind of property class of the investment. To calculate multifamily value, the net operating income of the property is divided by the cap rate. This is why knowing the cap rate is imperative to understanding the overall value.

 

4 Things Real Estate Appraisers Won’t Tell You

4 Things Real Estate Appraisers Won’t Tell You

If working with a real estate appraiser feels like a frustrating and complicated matter, you’re not alone. There’s a reason it feels as though your appraiser is keeping something from you and that’s because he or she is keeping secrets. Here are a few things you probably didn’t know about your appraiser.

  1. Appraisers are Under Pressure

When the housing bubble burst a few years ago and created the Great Recession, mortgage lenders weren’t the only ones that took the heat. Appraisers also came under fire and the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Protection Act of 2010 now requires the government to keep a closer eye on all real estate appraisers. This is why the process is so much more complex and takes more time.

  1. Appraisers are No Longer Local

Those same reforms have created a situation in which appraisers are often sent to regions with which they have no familiarity. Since they don’t know the markets that are local to the properties they’re appraising, their estimates may be either too low or too high. This can keep a homeowner from getting the true value for their home and, conversely, can prevent a buyer from affording a home that should be within their range.

  1. Who Does the Appraiser Really Work For?

In a normal home-buying scenario, the buyer pays the fee for the appraiser, which can fall anywhere within the $350 to $500 range. Even so, the appraiser doesn’t work for you and his reports go directly to the lender. This means that neither the buyer nor the seller will likely see the appraisal firsthand. According to federal law, you have to be given a copy of the appraisal, if you submit a written request for it. However, most people aren’t aware of the law, so they never see the appraisal for which they paid.

  1. Always Get a Second Opinion

It can be beneficial to get an appraisal of your own in advance, so you’ll have something to compare to the official appraiser’s findings. This can be fairly simple by asking your real estate agent to deliver a broker’s price opinion. While your lender may not accept the broker’s opinion in place of the appraisal, it does provide that point of reference. A difference in estimates can end up saving you as much as $20,000 on a home purchase.

Appraisers won’t tell you everything about their jobs. This is partly because they have to react to pressure from banks and that affects every appraisal. By staying alert and seeking outside advice, you may be able to better ensure your appraisal is fair and on point with the area market.