Understanding Closing Costs on a Property

Understanding Closing Costs on a Property

Closing costs comprise a large chunk of what you might have to pay for as a borrower and property buyer. Failing to factor closing costs into your budget can have a detrimental impact towards your ability to keep up with your mortgage payments. Here is everything you need to know about closing costs.

 

What Is It?

 

Closing costs, as the name implies, refer to the costs that a borrower must pay when he/she finalizes the purchase of a property, be it residential or commercial. While these costs can add up to a considerable sum, both parties involved in the transaction shoulder a portion of the closing costs.

 

What Fees are Involved?

 

The seller pays a number of the fees that make up the closing costs of a property he/she is trying to sell. These include the real estate broker’s commissions, which can easily reach up to six percent of the property’s purchase price. Other expenses included in the closing costs are your application fees, legal representative’s fees, and any discount points that are useable. Taxes are also tacked into a property’s closing costs, which can sum up to about 15 percent of the agreed-upon purchase price.

 

What is a Title Search?

 

Another common cost category you’ll encounter when trying to close on a property is title search. A third-party company performs a comprehensive background check of the property to make sure there are no undisclosed heirs and unpaid claims on the property being sold. Home buyers are also expected to pay title insurance fees, which basically covers the policy holder of any costs associated with ownership issues.

 

How Do You Minimize Closing Costs?

 

One way to minimize your closing costs is to pay cash for the property. You can reduce your total costs by as much as 1 percent of the property’s purchase price. You also effectively eliminate fees, such as loan origination and appraisal charges. You can also cut your closing costs, as a buyer, by foregoing the services of a realtor. Instead, deal directly with the owner. While this means more due diligence required on your part in order to make sure the transaction is completed properly, it helps you avoid the hefty commissions paid out to a realtor.

 

Make sure you fully understand your exact closing costs before you even sign any paperwork or give a confirmation to the other party involved. You can find a number of free closing cost calculators online that can help you determine your estimates.

 

Likely Issues to Face Real Estate Projects

Likely Issues to Face Real Estate Projects

Every city, state and country has residential and commercial real estate development plans that are currently underway. In addition, every society has social problems that increase the difficulty of work for real estate developers. The following issues are likely to affect the success of real estate projects now and in the future.

 

Untimely Delays

 

Delays in real estate projects can last for years longer than expected. These delays may be the result of social problems, such as decreased funding for residential projects or reduced needs to relocate in the case of remote workers. Untimely delays are some of the worst problems to affect real estate developers and their clients.

 

Immigration

 

Increased immigration results in increased demand for affordable, multifamily housing. In addition, massive surges in immigration may happen very quickly and result in overcrowding in certain cities. This puts increased pressures on urban, suburban and rural communities to accommodate these changes quickly.

 

Climate Change

 

Climate change is one factor that fuels many people to immigrate from one city or country to another. They may have experienced a natural disaster, such as a hurricane or flood, that destroyed their property, forcing them to relocate.

 

Global warming has increased the number of hurricanes that occur worldwide. The result is increased flooding that has made it more difficult to plan and develop projects.

 

Technology

 

Technology is a growing trend in the real estate industry. More property developers are willing to adopt new, innovative building technologies, such as touch-free electronic devices and motion detection lighting. The costs of adopting technology continues to be expensive and will increase as the features become more complicated.

 

Infrastructure

 

Infrastructure underinvestment continues to increase the risks of constructing buildings and increase delays in finishing projects on time. The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) predicts that ongoing underinvestment in infrastructure will add to economic burdens that negatively affect working professionals, families and businesses.

 

In the complex, modern world, no real estate developer works without facing a host of problems. From worsened climate change to reduced economic funding, developers are more likely to delay or cancel projects than they were several decades ago. They must be prepared for a problem to occur during any step of the process, whether it’s creating a valid contract or scouting for viable land to purchase.

 

                                                    

 

                         

How to Qualify for a Home Loan

How to Qualify for a Home Loan

Buying a home is a big goal many families have. However, a purchase that can easily reach six figures limits the ability of most people to pay cash. That’s why it’s important to figure out how to qualify for a home loan.

Track Income

Gone are the days in which anyone could walk off the street and leave with a “liar loan.” Instead, it’s necessary to provide proof of income before qualifying for a home mortgage. Banks want to know that a borrower is likely to have the means to pay off a loan. Therefore, saving few pay stubs and having access to previous tax returns is a necessity. These documents will help lenders assess the relative ability of prospective borrowers.

Build A Good Credit Record

Banks will pull a borrower’s credit report before giving her a budget for buying a new home. This will have a list of outstanding debts, and it might also show some debts that are paid in full. Banks want to see that prospective borrowers have a relatively low debt-to-income ratio. Those who have high levels of debt before a mortgage will likely be riskier borrowers for the bank. Paying debts by the due date is the most important component of building a good credit record. It’s important to remember that those with higher credit scores will secure loans with lower interest rates.

Save Money

There are some government-backed lending programs that allow borrowers to get into a home for no money down. However, these are not always the best option. They can come with mortgage insurance that’s intended to protect the lender while doing nothing other than raise the cost of borrowing for the borrower. Those who are able to put at least 20% toward the purchase of a new home will avoid mortgage insurance, and this will cut down on their monthly payment. Additionally, those who have a good down payment will have equity from the beginning. A borrower who puts no money down will have no equity to protect them from owing more than the value of their residence if the market drops.

A mortgage is a requirement for many families to purchase a home. Shopping around can be a good idea that can sometimes provide lower interest rates. However, the most important steps to take toward getting a mortgage are building a nice income and down payment while also working to achieve a high credit score. Those who pay attention to these goals will likely qualify for a mortgage with a relatively good rate.

                                                    

 

                                

What to Ask Your Real Estate Agent When Buying Your First Home

What to Ask Your Real Estate Agent When Buying Your First Home

With an ever increasing number of online tools available for home buyers, it can be easier than ever to buy a home without the guidance of a seasoned real estate agent. That still doesn’t mean it’s a good idea, however. This is particularly true for first-time buyers. There are just so many variables to buying a new home and so much that a seasoned real estate agent brings to the table. Here are three questions first-time home buyers should ask their agent.

  1. Where should I look?

When buyers begin to look at homes, they generally think about where they want to live in terms of commute times, walkability or maybe school districts. What they don’t always think about are things like tax rates, traffic, parking or zoning. Sometimes living on the north or the south side of a certain street can make a huge difference or living just a few blocks east or west may save you thousands of dollars or millions of headaches.

  1. What additional expenses can I expect?

It is a common misconception that owning a home is much cheaper than renting. The truth is, when you rent, your landlord is responsible for any number of expenses that suddenly become yours once you own your own home. These can include things like HOA fees, sewer, water and trash collection, property taxes, mortgage insurance and an entire plethora of upkeep and maintenance expenses. The big difference between owning and renting, however, is that all that money you spend on a home is building equity, while rent never will. By asking your real estate agent what additional expenses you can expect, you will have a much better idea of what you can realistically afford to spend on a mortgage.

  1. Would you buy this home?

Real estate agents have to walk a thin line between keeping their clients happy in the short term and making sure they will be happy with their purchase in the long run. Sometimes clients fall in love with a home that an agent can see a million problems with, but if that’s the home the clients decide they want, that’s the home the agent will help them get. Before you get too fixated on a home, ask your agent if they would buy it and why or why not.

 

How to Find a Luxury Property in your Area

How to Find a Luxury Property in your Area

If you want to start investing in real estate, you’ll probably start with homes in the low to moderate price ranges. This will help you build up some capital, but you won’t make a good profit until you start dealing in luxury housing. When you’re ready, it’s important to know where to find high-end homes that will earn you a better profit. While you can search listings, there are a few more efficient strategies for finding your next investment property.

Socialize With the Wealthy

In any career path, your advancement will depend as much on who you know as it does on your specific expertise. This is equally true when it comes to investing in luxury real estate. You can meet wealthy individuals by joining health spas, country clubs, and other places where the social elite are more likely to congregate. Developing friendships and acquaintances with the wealthy will give you the inside track on luxury real estate. You’ll be among the first to find out who will be selling their properties in the near future.

Provide a Service

The wealthy have unique problems that affect their finances, and they’re always looking for that special professional who can help them alleviate their concerns. Whether you prepare taxes, sell insurance, or have experience in the lending industry, you have skills that the wealthy need. By using those skills specifically to help the wealthy, you can create a niche career for yourself. Additionally, you’ll position yourself to learn about luxury home sales before they hit the market.

Host Seminars to the Wealthy

You can solve a problem for several wealthy individuals at once by hosting a seminar. The event should provide comfortable seating, good quality snacks, and a secluded environment where they can focus on your lecture. Instead of giving specifics for solving the problem, your seminar should focus more on why you’re qualified to solve the problem for them. You can give some generalized information, but you want to ensure they will still need to hire you by the end of the lecture.

You can also work with a real estate agent who deals primarily with luxury real estate. They can help you find high-end homes that are new to the market. An agent can also keep you informed about open houses to help you explore more properties in the market. This type of professional assistance can make your search easier and shorter.

 

How to Know You’re Getting a Good Price on your New Home

How to Know You’re Getting a Good Price on your New Home

While you should work with a real estate agent to help you find your new home, it’s important to remember that the agent earns a percentage-based commission on the house you do buy. While most agents are reputable, you should still be prepared to do some of your own research. Knowing the fair market value of a home will help you get more house for your dollar.

Research Recently Sold Homes

You can do a little research by looking at recently sold homes that resemble the home you want to buy. If you’re looking at a 2,400 square foot home with two bedrooms and two baths, look for the same size homes that were recently sold. While the condition of the home and additional amenities may also affect the sale price, the home you want to buy should be priced within the same ballpark.

Look at Other Homes on the Market

You should attend open houses and tours of other homes that are for sale within the same area. This will give you a better understanding of the price ranges for comparable homes. By touring them, you’ll also see what amenities or features are affecting the prices of homes in the area. As you learn more about the market, you’ll gain the expertise to accurately judge home prices in your community.

Be Skeptical of Private Sellers

Many buyers don’t realize they’re overpaying when they buy a home from a private seller. When a seller hires an agent, the price of the home is marked up by about 3% to cover the agent’s commission. A seller who chooses to sell without an agent should mark their asking price down by that 3% to reflect that they’re not paying the commission, but many don’t take that into consideration.

In the end, you’ll have to trust your own instincts. If you think a seller is charging too much for their home, you can and should move on with your search. In many cases, the seller may lower their asking price rather than risk losing the sale. If they hold fast to their original price, keep in mind that there are more homes on the market. It may take a little longer, but you will find your ideal home at a more reasonable sale price.