Your Guide To Understanding Property Investment Lingo

Your Guide To Understanding Property Investment Lingo

Real estate is one of those industries that has plenty of jargon. Some terms may sound like a totally different language. For regular consumers, it is not critically important to understand all the jargon. For real estate investors, industry jargon matters. Here are some of the terms investors should add to their daily vocabulary.

Net Operating Income

Known as NOI, this term defines how much cash flow investors generate if there is no lien or mortgage on the property. Most investors calculate NOI on an annual basis minus vacancy rates and expenses. Experts say investors should see a 40 to 50 percent NOI when compared to net rental income.

Cap Rate

The capitalization rate, also known as the cap rate, is used to determine an investment’s annual return based on the estimated profit generated from a property in one year. To calculate the cap rate, divide the above mentioned NOI by the sales price or the appraised value of a property.

Real Estate Owned

When investors use the term real estate owned (REO), they are referring to a property that is currently owned by a bank. In most cases, the property went into foreclosure, and the bank listed the property for sale at a public auction. When a property does not sell at auction, the bank must maintain possession of the property. REO properties are popular among real estate investors since banks often list these homes for much less than their appraised value.

Capital Gains

The goal of any investment property is to make money by renting or by capital appreciation, also known as capital gain. To determine the capital gain of a property, subtract the current value of the investment by the purchase price. If there is a gain in value, investors must pay a capital gains tax. However, the tax is not applicable until the asset is sold

.Debt-to-Equity Ratio

This ratio helps investors determine how much real ownership they have in a property. The ratio, expressed as a percentage, compares the total debt owed on an investment compared to its equity. For example, if an investor buys a property valued at $100,000 and used an $80,000 mortgage plus $20,000 of their own money as a down payment, the investment would have an 80 percent debt-to-equity ratio. Many banks and mortgage lenders prefer a ratio of 80 percent or less.
Now that you have a better understanding of some of the most frequently used jargon in the real estate investment industry, you are ready to tackle your next investment with ease.
Waterfront Property: What to Avoid When Investing

Waterfront Property: What to Avoid When Investing

Buying a luxurious waterfront property will reap the long-term rewards of enjoyment on the property. With that said, people must understand a few key facts to know what they must avoid when buying beautiful waterfront properties. Waterfront properties can turn into a hassle if not bought under the right conditions. From the ongoing battle with rust and mold to being in a potential flood zone, waterfront properties can present a number of challenges. Potential home buyers must do their due diligence to make a solid real estate investment.

#1: Failure to Examine the Bulkheads

The bulkheads require a specialist to inspect the bulkheads because this protects the property from the water. Bulkheads could be logs, large stones or a concrete slab. Ensuring its integrity from the start is a great way to protect a real estate investment.

#2: Not Preparing the Financing

Before an individual goes out to buy a waterfront property, they should first understand how the financing must be there. Waterfront property classifies under a specialty loan, and they will normally cost more than a regular property. Because of this, home buyers shouldn’t wait until the last minute to try to put the financing together because it will cost more.

#3: Not Checking That It Can Withstand Harsh Weather

Waterfront property will normally put up with more abuse than a regular home because it sits on a waterfront. Because of this, the property could face more wear and tear from mother nature. Check to see that the property uses stainless steel, and they have storm shutters for the home.

#4: Not Securing the Right Property Insurance

When an individual owns waterfront property, they must secure the right type of property insurance to protect themselves. Living near the water opens the home to the potential for flooding, so an individual should have the right kind of flood insurance to protect them. Not to mention, they should look carefully at the terms of the flood insurance. Insurance often comes down to someone’s level of risk tolerance, but when someone owns waterfront property, flood insurance is a must.

These are a few things that people should avoid when it comes to buying a waterfront property. These mistakes can cost a homeowner thousands of dollars. Many times, when someone goes to buy a property like this, they feel excited to own it, but they have to keep their wits about them and examine it carefully.

Making Real Estate Investments in a Competitive Market

Making Real Estate Investments in a Competitive Market

Building a profitable real estate portfolio is a proven way to attain financial freedom. However, finding profitable investments on a continuous basis is a challenge, especially in red-hot housing markets. When demand is greater than supply, housing prices rise causing many investors to struggle with finding those lucrative discounted properties. Here are some tips that will help investors find profitable deals in competitive markets.

Search for Less Competitive Markets 

Although the housing market is hot in many locations, there are still regions in the U.S. where competition is minimal and prices are low. However, to find these markets, investors will need to step outside their comfort zone and look for areas where they do not normally invest. The Midwest, the Deep South, and some Southwestern locations are still affordable. Additionally, these regions are at the least amount of risk to see deep losses in value if the housing market does tank. Because properties in these regions are affordable and are typically not subject to the regular up and down cycles of appreciation and depreciation, investors can find profitable properties that can help them shore up their portfolios.

Look for “Quick Flips” 

Finding a property that produces huge profits in a competitive market is a rarity. Therefore, many successful investors turn to “quick flips.” Essentially, they scale down the size of their projects and look for smaller investments that produce smaller returns. Foreclosures, short sales, and distressed properties will always sell at discounted prices in any market, so it should not be any trouble finding properties at reasonable prices that investors can flip in a short time frame.

Narrow Searches to “Off Market Properties” 

The bottom line in today’s real estate market is many sellers want to market their properties privately. Instead of all the headaches of dealing with an aggressive marketing strategy, some sellers just want to go through the process quietly. This is good news for real estate investors who are struggling to find quality deals with “on market” properties. To find quality off-market deals, investors should contact agents in their chosen regions and ask for information about properties for sale that are not listed on the MLS. A few other tried and true methods to find profitable deals is through networking, word of mouth or to just keep looking around.

Keeping these tips in mind when you are looking to make your next investment in this competitive market, will make your next investment a breeze.

Reasons Why An Objective Risk Model Pays Off In Real Estate Investing

Reasons Why An Objective Risk Model Pays Off In Real Estate Investing

Winner’s curse is one of the most critical aspects of real estate investing. It is a situation where the winner of a bid pays more than the worth of the property. It is an unfortunate occurrence since no one wants their efforts to go into waste. Performing objective due diligence is the best way to dodge the curse or any other unforeseen circumstances. Additionally, it helps to overcome bias in decision making.
Although the winner’s curse is unfortunate to an investor, it is a benefit to real estate fund managers. This is because they can differentiate early enough whether a valuation is optimistic or conservative. The curse has also caught experienced investors. They tend to overlook certain property fundamentals or rely on unviable strategies.
Atlantic Richfield engineers noticed that sometimes aggressive bids might prove to be too optimistic. They discovered that in the oil and gas auctions, essential information might be hidden beneath the surface.
Although valuations may vary in different industries, in real estate, prices might not reflect the underlying value. This is maybe due to the risk in investment property of setting the wrong prices, false assumptions or business plans that are not feasible. Furthermore, in private equity real estate, there is the rush to close the deal instead of waiting for the right opportunity or time.
For most investors, sticking to conservative strategies seems the most rational thing to do. However, behavioral economics indicate that markets are not always rational. In most cases, sellers hold unrealistic prices while buyers concentrate on factors that do not add intrinsic value.
There are limitless deals in the real estate industry. However, it is advisable to carefully check the inefficiencies that prevent investment opportunities to achieve the expected value. In fact, nowadays there is growing data science that can help to evaluate properties before committing an investment.
Due diligence is the best way to control the risks involved in real estate investment. However, it may not provide the nature of the risks. There are two major lessons when investing in real estate. First, joint ventures do not always guarantee favorable returns. Although getting into partnerships might reduce structural risks, they also limit control of investment and ultimately lessen the proceeds. Second, making off-market deals does not always guarantee a better return on investment. Therefore as an investor, find a suitable data-driven procedure that will help evade the winner’s curse.
How Technology Has Solved Two of the Biggest Problems in Real Estate Investing

How Technology Has Solved Two of the Biggest Problems in Real Estate Investing

If you want to be a better real estate investor, you have to overcome common challenges. The two biggest problems that real estate investors face is finding the property and then actually getting the funding to acquire it. However, it doesn’t have to be as hard as it used to be. Here is how technology is changing the way people solve these issues:

Properties

Finding properties is one of the biggest challenges that investors face. After all, the market value of an area is not set it stone. In order to understand if something will pay you back, you need to know the area.

Location Scouting

You can now know about an area and what kind of demographics it has easier than before. First of all, with online maps, you can scout it on your laptop. Secondly, people on the ground can be hired to walk around and film with a drone to capture video so you can really get the feel for the location.

Sales Trends

You can look into the local economies of locations that you are considering. See how their local businesses have been doing in recent months with sales. In addition, find out the employment rates to make sure there is an economy that is healthy enough to support the investment you are looking to make before just jumping in without the information.

Funding

The Need for Capital

You might have the best information in the world, but you still need funding to get that property. Therefore, raising capital has always been a burden to investors. Thanks to technology, there are new options, however.

Crowdfunding

Using public sites you can raise funds from investors, large and small, all around the world. This lets you act quickly on properties without breaking the bank. In addition, you might find properties that you didn’t otherwise think you could afford.

When it comes to real estate investing, it can be one of the most lucrative opportunities in the world. However, to make money with real estate, you need to find the property first. Then, you need to get the funding to purchase it. Technology has made these two things much easier than they ever were in the past. Therefore, you should look to utilize this technology in your own career to leverage the benefits contained.

3 Reasons Why You Should Rent A House Instead of Buy

3 Reasons Why You Should Rent A House Instead of Buy

“In this current climate” is a cliché lately – but it is a valid cliché. However, in this current climate, some people might just not be able to afford a house. Or conversely, a homeowner finds that the value of their home is at an all-time high and wants to cash in. There are plenty of reasons why renting is a beneficial option for buying, especially in certain markets.

  1. Renting allows for major life flexibility. In major markets, younger people are renting over buying, and this seems to be an extremely popular choice. Due to unsustainable raises in the housing market buying a house may not be an option, therefore renting is the best option. By renting, renters allow themselves the greatest flexibility if a good opportunity presents itself, or if they are not happy with their current situation, or if they want to move to another place quickly. Renting keeps the lease down to one of two years, allowing for life improvements and possible pivots in the future.
  1. Renting does not lock your life down into debt for 30 years. If not subscribing to the typical white picket fence dream, the prospect of facing paying a mortgage for 30 years may not be the best life choice. The stress of having to maintain a payment for so long locks people down into lifestyle choices – possibly a job they may not like, or circumstances they may change, or unforeseen debts that may occur. There are also studies that show a person having a debt hanging over their heads is clearly detrimental to life.
  1. Investing instead of paying may lead to bigger monetary gain. The math seems to be there. There are some bets unconsciously made when buying – the result of investments, the real estate market prices (after all, the recession did a number on many people), the pace of inflation, property taxes, paying interest. These calculations have renters winning out in the long run, however, the numbers may be variable.

No matter how many facts and numbers are thrown around, it is ultimately down to the individual needs and desires of the person making the choice. Behavior is behavior, and people tend to seek out facts that support what they feel. Good luck!